Friday, August 29, 2008

Retailers, the active controllers

Book Mark
Retailing Logistics & Fresh Food Packaging
Kerstin Gustafsson, Gunilla Jönson, David Smith and Leigh Sparks
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Collaborative logistics

Not too long ago, retailers were merely the passive recipients of manufacturers’ products, allocated to stores by the manufacturers in anticipation of demand. In contrast, today’s retailers are the active controllers of product supply inreaction to known customer demand, say Kerstin Gustafsson, Gunilla Jönson, David Smith and Leigh Sparks in Retailing Logistics & Fresh Food Packaging: Managing Change in the Supply Chain.

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Communication skills of a CEO

Book Mark
Manage the Media
William J. Holstein
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Communication illiteracy

It is common knowledge that only some CEOs do brilliantly when communicating and managing public perception, while the vast majority doesn’t. The roots of the problem are deep, discovers William J. Holstein in Manage the Media. “The author bemoans that corporate boards don’t normally place a high priority on communications skills when hiring a CEO.

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'Opportunities at your door step'

Book Mark
Business Genius
Peter Fisk
( http://www.wileyeurope.com/)

Consider entering a market nearby

The best opportunities are often close to home, says Peter Fisk in Business Genius. “When looking to grow, adjacent markets can offer the easiest, fastest and low est-risk opportunities,” he suggests. Blame it on the blinkered vision of managers, but it is common to find companies looking far before they look near, when considering geographical markets, Fisk rues.

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Monday, August 25, 2008

Courageous leaders

Manage Mentor
High Altitude Leadership
Chris Warner and Don Schmincke
( http://www.josseybass.com/)

Leadership lessons from treacherous treks

People want the truth, no matter how bad or ugly, write Chris Warner and Don Schmincke in High Altitude Leadership. “They know the bad news already. They just want to see if their leaders have the courage to acknowledge it.” As with peaks, it needs bravery to face the facts, the authors observe, drawing lessons from the world’s most forbidding heights. “Fear of failure or fear of consequences like retaliation, being ostracised, being blamed, or looking bad to the boss, propels cowards into the tent of safety.”

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The role of software in India's growth

Books 2 Byte
Sustaining India’s Growth Miracle
Jagdish N. Bhagwati and Charles W. Calomiris
( http://www.ravemedia.in/)

Hail software!

“Hitherto, wealth was acquired by breaking laws or at least bending them to one’s convenience; software was the first instance where wealth was created honestly and legally, and, more important, visibly so,” opines Ashish Arora in one of the essays included in Sustaining India’s Growth Miracle edited by Jagdish N. Bhagwati and Charles W. Calomiris. Software made the ‘Brand India’ a respected one, paving the way for other sectors, Arora avers.

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Guide for a smart Network

Books 2 Byte
CCNP Quick Reference
Denise Donohue, Brent Stewart and Jerold Swan
( http://www.ciscopress.com/)

Network gyan

The phrase ‘traffic policing’ may remind you of cops on the road, but as a network term it refers to the controlling of traffic through an interface. “Policing drops traffic, whereas shaping buffers it for sending later,” explain Denise Donohue, Brent Stewart and Jerold Swan in CCNP Quick Reference.

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Ways To Make It Happen

Books 2 Byte
World Class Quality
Keki R. Bhote and Adi K. Bhote
( http://www.jaicobooks.com/)

Design of experiments

More than 15 years ago, a labour team in Motorola was trying to improve a wave solder process that was running at a defect level of 10,000 ppm for poor solderability. “The team’s very ambitious goal was to reduce the defect level to 200 ppm – a 50:1 improvement… The team decided on a Full Factorial experiment…” Thus reads one of the many examples in World Class Quality, second edition, by Keki R. Bhote and Adi K. Bhote.

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'Better' than 'More'

Books 2 Byte
New Strategies for Reputation Management
Andrew Griffin
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Coping with ‘information anarchy’

Organisations, which generally like structure and predictability, may see the Internet as ‘a sort of information anarchy’ posing reputation challenges. “The Internet has become a powerful medium for anti-corporate messages,” writes Andrew Griffin in New Strategies for Reputation Management.

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Four aspects of software quality

Books 2 Byte
Software Quality: A Practitioner’s Approach
Kamna Malik and Praveen Choudhary
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

On convergence track

Four aspects of software quality are converging, and these are business excellence, service excellence, security, and information integrity, say Kamna Malik and Praveen Choudhary in Software Quality: A Practitioner’s Approach. They find that at present, each of these aspects is dealt with separately.

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The unique dynamics of investing in China

BookValue
China Fireworks
Robert Hsu
( http://www.wiley.com/ )

Six-step China strategy

Investing in China is more than looking at the financial promise and performance of individual stocks, opines Robert Hsu in ‘China Fireworks’. He says that to really profit from the China miracle, your investments must take into account the way the Chinese people live and work, the way they structure and develop their businesses, and the expectations they have for becoming a significant component of the global community. Hsu is aghast that investors of all types have rushed to capitalise on what appears to be China’s rapid rise, but without the proper preparation.

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'The guiding light on the horizon'

BookValue
Investing the Templeton Way
Lauren C. Templeton and Scott Phillips
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/ )

‘Maximum pessimism’

The point of ‘maximum pessimism’ is when you should invest says John M. Templeton in the foreword to a book that captures his style: ‘Investing the Templeton Way’ by Lauren C. Templeton and Scott Phillips. “In almost every activity in life people try to go where the outlook is best. You look for a job in an industry with a good future or build a factory in an area where the prospects are best,” he writes.

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Using India for knowledge work

BookValue
Doing Business in the 21st Century India
Gunjan Bagla
( http://www.hachetebookgroupusa.com/ )

Winning in India

There is plenty of ‘white space’ for Western companies to expand their revenues in India, says Gunjan Bagla in ‘Doing Business in the 21st Century India’. Your head of sales and your CFO will love the India opportunity, Bagla assures. “Your marketing and human resource team will definitely have to stretch. And you may need to hire many bi-culturally savvy project managers, depending on your business.”

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The 'street-smart writing tips’

Write Right
202 Great Cover Letters
Michael Betrus
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Pay attention to details

How to give the recruiters and hiring managers an example of the work you can perform? A great cover letter and resume, says Michael Betrus in 202 Great Cover Letters. “You are not well represented by a letter that has a typo or is not grammatically correct. Unless they are desperate, recruiters never recommend candidates whose letters and resumes contain such errors.” The attention you pay to the details sends a message far beyond that of the words used in your response to a posting, the author observes.

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Flexibility is a special type of genius

Mentor
Get Your Frog Out of the Well
Chuck Boyer
( http://www.wileyindia.com/ )

Cultural levellers

People working in high-tech businesses in the US and India have more things in common than they have differences, observes Chuck Boyer in Get Your Frog Out of the Well. This is true whether the companies are large or small, he adds. “The all-consuming work of inventing or developing a product and getting it to market efficiently and successfully, of solving problems, of figuring out the issues and expectations… these are all great cultural levellers.”

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Friday, August 22, 2008

Tax optimisation

Books of Account
Global Sourcing: Shifting Strategies
(http://www.pwc.com/)

Saving on sourcing

Is tax optimisation a key consideration in sourcing? Perhaps, yes, but only for about one in two companies, finds a recent survey of retail and consumer companies by PricewaterhouseCoopers.
"Thirty-nine per cent do not factor tax costs into landed costs or only do so to a limited extent. Nearly one-third of the companies do not consider tax costs as part of their review of their global sourcing arrangements, but 61 per cent do measure their tax exposures to customs duties, corporate and environmental taxes. Only 18 per cent include tax efficiency as a metric in assessing employee reward," informs Global Sourcing: Shifting Strategies.

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Fuelling factor of family wars

Books of Account
Family Wars
Grant Gordon and Nigel Nicholson
(http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

In-fighting spillover

Many family wars seem to be aroused, fuelled, and amplified by nothing less than lack of self-restraint - people acting on impulse or wish fulfilment. Thus observe Grant Gordon and Nigel Nicholson in Family Wars. "Some of the most poisonous wars are stimulated by more than just self-indulgence: by acts that trip a switch in the circuitry of conflict. Some are deliberate. Some are just thoughtless. Some are ambiguous."

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Public sector vs private insurers

Books of Account
Indian Insurance: A Profile
H. Narayanan
(http://www.jaicobooks.com/)

Insurance challenges

With financial services becoming market-driven, and with unforeseen fluctuations in interest regime, life insurance companies have to exercise utmost care in product designing and pricing, advises H. Narayanan in Indian Insurance: A Profile. "For example, little did the seasoned life insurance monolith LIC think it would be obliged to withdraw some of its assured return plans a couple of years after their launch due to the southern slide of the interest rates, and. the returns on the capital could not sustain the schemes."

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'Taking ownership is about change'

Book Mark
49 Marketing Secrets (That Work) to Grow Sales
Ron Finklestein
( http://www.ravemedia.in/)

Ownership empowers

All successful people understand that their successes come with, and through, other people, says Ron Finklestein in 49 Marketing Secrets (That Work) to Grow Sales. “Successful people recognise these individuals and appreciate them for their contribution to the results.” They will also assume complete responsibility for things not working, because they are they owners!

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About consumer behaviour

Book Mark
Statistics for Marketing and Consumer Research
Mario Mazzocchi
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Four types of surveys

Consumer behaviour is a complex discipline, the main reason being that it is not a discipline, frets Mario Mazzocchi in Statistics for Marketing and Consumer Research. It is rather a cross-section of disciplines that provide different perspectives on the set of factors expected to explain and predict how people behave and why, he explains.

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Twelve wheely good best practices

Book Mark
Awake at the Wheel
Mitchell Lewis Ditkoff
( http://www.morganjamespublishing.com/)

Feel comfortable with discomfort

You don’t get an idea, an idea gets you, distinguishes Mitchell Lewis Ditkoff in Awake at the Wheel. “Get out of the way. Be willing to receive the big idea … Don’t waste your time thinking you are smart,” he advises. Second in the list of ‘twelve wheely good best practices’ is to feel comfortable with discomfort. Because sometimes feeling bad is just a clue that something good is on its way.

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Monday, August 18, 2008

Essential components of a comprehensive hotel website

Books 2 Byte
Tourism Development Revisited: Concepts, issues and paradigms
Sutheeshna Babu S, Sitikantha Mishra, and Bivraj Bhusan Parida
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Potential of hotels’ own Web sites

In the past, large online travel agents such as Expedia and Travelocity cornered the market on hotel room reservations, inform Rob Law and Catherine Cheung in Analysing China-based hotel websites, an essay included in ‘Tourism Development Revisited: Concepts, issues and paradigms’.

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'Trust is built one-on-one, eye-to-eye'

Books 2 Byte
Kiss Theory Good Bye
Bob Prosen
( http://www.ravemedia.in/)

Get out and talk to people

The old ‘open door’ policy goes a long way toward helping leaders and workers clarify information so that people can do their jobs and meet their objectives, counsels Bob Prosen in Kiss Theory Good Bye. There is no quicker way to lose touch with an organisation than to close your door to write memos and send email,” he writes.

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'Lack of self-confidence is the biggest barrier to success'

Books 2 Byte
Tarzan and Jane: How to thrive in the new corporate jungle
Margot Katz
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Women limit themselves

Having confidence is a basic ingredient for success and well-being, asserts Margot Katz in Tarzan and Jane: How to thrive in the new corporate. Astonished at ‘the extraordinary lack of self-confidence in so many extraordinarily talented women,’ the author quotes Trisha Watson of Microsoft to say that men have a greater innate sense of career confidence that allows them to get on and progress. “Many women don’t set their sights high enough and need to be convinced they can do something before doing it: they are more risk averse.”

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'The importance of technological forces in strategic management'

Books 2 Byte
Strategic Management
Abbass F. Alkhafaji
( http://www.jaicobooks.com/)

Technology is not just automation

Massive investment in information technology over many years can pay off in the form of increased productivity and greater global competitiveness, says Abbass F. Alkhafaji in Strategic Management. He cites research findings of economist Frank Lichtenberg of the Colombia Business School — that computer equipment and employment jointly contribute some 21 per cent of the output of the companies studied, even though they only account for about a tenth of labour costs and 10 to 15 per cent of total capital expenditure.

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Making things smaller

Books 2 Byte
Nanocomputing
Vishal Sahni and Debabrata Goswami
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

No easy ‘Alice’ touch here

Contrary to popular belief, the marriage of chemistry, computing, and microscopic engineering known as nanotechnology is not a new phenomenon, write Vishal Sahni and Debabrata Goswami in Nanocomputing. “Scientists have been working on the possibilities for decades. Nanotechnology today is an emerging set of tools, techniques, and unique applications involving the structure and co mposition of materials on a nanoscale — that is, billionths of a metre.”

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'Focus on the profitable'

BookValue
The Entrepreneur’s Book of Checklists: 1000 tips to help you start and grow your business
Robert Ashton
(http://www.pearsoned.co.in/)

Business survival tips

Running out of cash is a major cause of business collapse, warns Robert Ashton in ‘The Entrepreneur’s Book of Checklists: 1000 tips to help you start and grow your business,’ second edition. The problem can happen in fast-growing businesses too, with demand for working capital rising along with turnover. “See it coming,” urges Ashton. “If you use a spreadsheet to forecast your cash flow accurately, you will see the danger signs a few months in advance. Act early and you can turn it round.”

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Intuitive decision-making

BookValue
How Tiger Does It: Put the Success Formula of a Champion into Everything You Do
Brad Kearns
(http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Tiger teachings

Whether your goal is lowering your weight or your golf score or raising your tax bracket, your actions should not be governed by a cookie-cutter template but by your intuitive sense of what is the right thing to do on a daily, weekly, monthly, and annual basis, advises Brad Kearns in ‘How Tiger Does It: Put the Success Formula of a Champion into Everything You Do’.

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A golden-guide

BookValue
The Goldwatcher: Demystifying Gold Investing
John Katz and Frank Holmes
( http://www.wiley.com/ )

Five Ms of gold investing

Mother Nature is heavily stacked against investors in gold exploration companies, yet you can find your way by using ‘the Five Ms’ strategy, say John Katz and Frank Holmes in ‘The Goldwatcher: Demystifying Gold Investing’. ‘Market cap’ is the first M. In the case of large gold companies, an investor can establish relative valuation by measuring the market cap against production level, reserve assets, geographic location, the authors instruct.

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'Research is a continuous process in urology'

Bill of Health
Understanding urology

Urology, also known as genito-urinary surgery, has come a long way, says Dr C. L. Ashok Kumar, Consultant Urologist, Chennai. “The patient must utilise the technology usefully in the correct perspective instead of dissection, discussion and hair-splitting,” he advises, during a recent lunch-hour interaction at Business Line.

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Brevity is the sister of talent

Mentor
Write to Sell: The Ultimate Guide to Great Copywriting
Andy Maslen
( http://www.ravemedia.in/ )

Writing is like fishing

Every word and sentence you write must mean something to your reader, advises Andy Maslen in Write to Sell: The Ultimate Guide to Great Copywriting. He compares writing to fishing. “Keep the line taut and you can bring it safely to the net. Let the line go slack — through sloppy writing, or just plain boring writing — and off it goes downstream…”
Your opening sentence is your main chance to hook readers for the journey, says Maslen. “Address them directly, start talking about them and their concerns, needs and wants, and you have their undivided attention.”

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Personality vs behaviour

Mentor
Performance: The Secrets of Successful Behaviour
Robin Stuart-Kotze
( http://www.pearsoned.co.in/)

Be a leader, not a celebrity

What drives performance is behaviour, not personality, says Robin Stuart-Kotze in Performance: The Secrets of Successful Behaviour.“Personality is what you are; behaviour is what you do, and it’s what you do that makes a difference,” he explains.
Yet, it is personality that gets the headlines because people would like to find ‘a secret key to success that does not require work and effort,’ the author bemoans. “People are actually highly adaptable and far more flexible than personality typing gives them credit for.” Bizarrely, personality typing often gives people an excuse not to adapt their behaviour.

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Amalgamation of banks

Books of Account
Financial Intermediation in a Less Developed Eco nomy: The History of the United Bank of India
Indrajit Mallick and Sugata Marjit
( http://www.sagepublications.com/ )

History of a bank

To construct a ‘storm free institution’ that would restore the faith of the common people in banking, and stem the panic in Bengal, was formed the UBI in December 1950, by amalgamating four banks. “During the Second World War, when the money market got artificially inflated and business seemed unlimited, crisis was already being anticipated,” recount Indrajit Mallick and Sugata Marjit in Financial Intermediation in a Less Developed Eco nomy: The History of the United Bank of India.

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Research in Social Science

Books of Account
A Passionate Humanitarian: VKRV Rao
S. L. Rao, N. Jayaram, V. M. Rao, M. V. Nadkarni, and R. S. Deshpande
( http://www.academicfoundation.com/ )

Institution-builder

“He could have been a greater economist, with contributions to match those of Sir Richard Stone, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in economic sciences for his empirical work on national income estimation. But he chose the path of an institution builder. It was through these institutions that he wanted the social science profession to contribute to the country.” Thus reminisces Vinod Vyasulu in one of the essays included in A Passionate Humanitarian: VKRV Rao.

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Forceful suggestions for sound governance

Books of Account
Corporate Social Responsibility & International Development
Michael Hopkins
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/ )

Corporate social development actions

It may be fashionably financial, and often perfectly legal, to ask why at all corporations should be involved in development, if the business of business is business. There are at least two reasons ‘why,’ argues Michael Hopkins in Corporate Social Responsibility & International Development. One, almost half the world’s population lives on less than $2 a day. And two, businesses need to work with others to create the capacities and conditions which sound governance requires, to ensure the sort of functioning society in which business can be done.

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Three ‘culture’ options

Book Mark
International Marketing Management: Text and Cases
U.C. Mathur
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Go hybrid

Three ‘culture’ options before companies with businesses worldwide is be global, multi-domestic, or hybrid, says U.C. Mathur in International Marketing Management: Text and Cases. “In the global strategy, a firm can retain its home country’s culture in the different nations,” he explains. “In a multi-domestic strategy, the firm adapts its working style to the culture of the host country.”

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The ‘headline’ tips

Book Mark
How to Get Clients to Come to You
Nigel Temple
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Headline, the gateway

The penultimate stage in the seven-stage system that Nigel Temple describes in How to Get Clients to Come to You is on producing effective copy using compellingwords. With the rise of the Internet as a communications tool, writing is a critical 21st-century marketing skill, says Temple. “The headline is the most important item in a promotional piece,” he begins. “It is the gateway through which readers choose whether or not to enter. It carries your message into the readers’ minds. And it entices them to read the rest of your copy.”

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The four scenarios of a seller

Book Mark
Escaping the Price-Driven Sale
Tom Snyder and Kevin Kearns
( www .tatamcgrawhill.com)

When customers look beyond price

The customer’s world has drastically and irrevocably changed, but the salesperson’s world has not kept up, fret Tom Snyder and Kevin Kearns in Escaping the Price-Driven Sale. The authors find that the customer no longer needs the salesperson to give product or service information; hence, information-gathering questions used in the past by salespeople to understand the customer’s business are no longer appropriate.

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Monday, August 11, 2008

Globality, a blockbuster new script!

Manage Mentor
Globality
Harold L. Sirkin, James W. Hemerling and Arindam K. Bhattacharya
( http://www.hachettebookgroupusa.com/)

Seven challenges in the new business world

Start by saying, “Glo…,” and you can be assured of a round of yawns. But this is different, say Harold L. Sirkin, James W. Hemerling and Arindam K. Bhattacharya in Globality. They define globality not as a new and different term for globalisation, but as the name for a new and different global reality in which we’ll all be competing with everyone, fr om everywhere, for everything.

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'Liquidity leads to inflation'

Books of Account
Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2008
( http://www.academicfoundation.com/)

Cost of forex heap

Reserves accumulate, but at what cost, wonders Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2008. “By October 2007, developing economies in the Asia-Pacific region had accumulated $3.4 trillion in foreign reserves, up from $2.7 trillion at the end of 2006.”

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'Allow sufficient time for results to be achieved'

Books of Account
Assessing Business Excellence
L. J. Porter and S. J. Tanner
( http://www.elsevier.com/ )

‘Excellence’ spill-over

Generally, awards of excellence to businesses are a happy idea for recipients, what with the razzmatazz invariably accompanying the occasion. But are there deeper benefits in adopting a business excellence approach? An early study to explore this question was that of the US GAO. It reviewed 20 companies that were among the highest-scoring applicants in the 1988 and 1989 Balridge Award process and came up with interesting findings, as one learns in Assessing Business Excellence, second edition by L. J. Porter and S. J. Tanner.

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'Desist dipping into your retirement savings'

Books of Account
Financial Planning: A Ready Reckoner
Madhu Sinha
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Start early, and retire peacefully

Retirement planning is an integral part of financial planning, says Madhu Sinha in Financial Planning: A Ready Reckoner. “Everyone wishes to have a comfortable retired life, but without adequate planning it probably will not happen,” she adds.

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'Not across the country, but across the hall!'

Books 2 Byte
Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion
Noah J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin and Robert B. Cialdini
( http://www.vivagoupindia.com/)

No e-mail on Fridays

Five thousand employees of US Cellular, a large wireless carrier, were shocked when told that they were no longer allowed to communicate with one another via e-mail on Fridays. “How could that be possible? In an age in which we’re all so dependent on electronic transmissions to communicate quickly, effectively and accurately with our co-workers, banning e-mail is almost like prohibiting the use of calculators in favour of fingers and toes,” narrate Noah J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin and Robert B. Cialdini in Yes! 50 secrets from the science of persuasion.

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Thirteen basic security principles

Books 2 Byte
Hacking Windows Exposed
Joel Scambray and Stuart McClure
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Distribute accountability for security

Hold everyone accountable for security. Thus reads the first of the thirteen basic security principles, in Hacking Windows Exposed, third edition by Joel Scambray and Stuart McClure. Since the number of thoughtful security experts in the world is not going to scale to cover all of the activities that occur on a daily basis, the authors advise distribution of accountability for security across the organisation.

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Attaining high team performance

Books 2 Byte
Smarter Execution
Xavier Gilbert, Bettina Büchel and Rhoda Davidson
( http://www.pearsoned.co.in/)

Team norms, a productivity tool

Teamwork finds emphasis in one of the ‘ten golden rules’ at Google, observes a new book from Xavier Gilbert, Bettina Büchel and Rhoda Davidson: Smarter Execution. They cite the Google CEO, Eric Schmidt, thus: “Modern corporate mythology has the unique decision maker as hero. We adhere to the view that the ‘many are smarter than the few,’ and solicit a broad base of views before reaching any decision.

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A 'SMART' Government

Books 2 Byte
Towards Improving Governance
S.K. Agarwal
( http://www.academicfoundation.com/)

Integrate e-gov projects

With the exception of the Railways Reservation System, IT (information technology) applications seem to have had no remarkable effect on the manner in which citizens benefit from the services of the Government, writes S.K. Agarwal in Towards Improving Governance. While initiatives such as common Citizen Services Centres can play a major role in increasing accessibility, there is the need for the domain ministries and local self-governance bodies to be computerised, the author suggests.

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(Mis)handling money

BookValue
101 Really Important Things You Already Know, But Keep Forgetting
Ernie J. Zelinski
( http://www.macmillanindia.com/ )

Financial insanity

Mishandling money is one of our favourite ways to get ourselves into difficulty, laments Ernie J. Zelinski in ‘101 Really Important Things You Already Know, But Keep Forgetting’. “Unfortunately, money is more often misused and abused than used intelligently… Financial insanity has developed its own big following.”

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Buy the 'best' and not an 'okay' stock!

BookValue
All About Stock Market Strategies: The Easy Way to Get Started
David Brown and Kassandra Bentley
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/ )

Three strategies of investing process

Stock selection, timing of the entry and exit, and portfolio management are the three strategies that make up the investing process, say David Brown and Kassandra Bentley in ‘All About Stock Market Strategies: The Easy Way to Get Started’. This process underlies every investing style – be it momentum, growth, or value.

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Write down your selling plan before you buy

BookValue
Sell & Sell Short
Alexander Elder
( http://www.wiley.com/)

Three essential assets of stock trading

Many traders buy in a very soggy way, bemoans Alexander Elder in ‘Sell & Sell Short’. They do not set profit targets or think about stop-losses, he adds. “When a stock goes their way, they tend to take profits too soon, out of insecurity and fear. When a stock goes against them, they grimly hold on, not knowing what to do wi th a puppy that is fouling up their living room and chewing up their couch.”

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The complaining customers

Book Mark
A Complaint is a Gift
Janelle Barlow and Clause Møller
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Lifeline to the customer

Nobody likes complaints. More so the customer service departments, as most of us would have learnt by experience as consumers. So, it comes as a refreshingly different message when Janelle Barlow and Clause Møller say complaints are an underutilised source of consumer and market information. “Complaining customers are still talking with us, giving us an opportunity to recapture their interest so they will be more likely to buy from us again,” they write in A Complaint is a Gift, second edition.

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Tracing the ‘routes’ of transactions

Book Mark
Marketing Planning
Malcolm McDonald
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Begin with a market map

Market segmentation helps a firm to target its limited resources on the most promising opportunities by sorting customers into economically manageable and prioritisable groups, says Malcolm McDonald on Marketing Planning. A useful way to tackle market segmentation is by drawing a market map, the author suggests.

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