Thursday, May 29, 2008

A test to assess learnable risks

Books of Account
Risk Intelligence
David Apgar
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Risk IQ

You know IQ as intelligence quotient and EQ as a similar measure for the emotional dimension. David Apgar introduces ‘risk IQ’ to help us manage what we don’t know. We need a test to measure our ability to assess learnable risks, he argues in Risk Intelligence.

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Personal transparency

Books of Account
Corporate Truth: The limits to transparency
Adrian Henriques
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/ )

Transparency can be our greatest ally

The culture of a company has a profound effect on whether personal transparency can flourish, writes Adrian Henriques in Corporate Truth: The limits to transparency. “In a very supportive culture, in which staff in general and management in particular are genuinely concerned for employees, it will naturally be easier for individuals to be open with each other. On the other hand, in a combative culture, transparency will be inhibited.”

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Monday, May 26, 2008

Globalising the young venture

Manage Mentor
The Quest for Global Dominance
Anil K. Gupta, Vijay Govindarajan and Haiyan Wang
Second edition ( http://www.wileyindia.com/)

Business in the world arena

If you are a company drawing up strategies for India and China, don’t forget to do three things: capture the growing market opportunities in these countries, proactively leverage their human resources to transform your global operations, and think of these two destinations as core to your global strategies and your permanent homes.
Thus advise Anil K. Gupta, Vijay Govindarajan and Haiyan Wang in The Quest for Global Dominance, second edition.

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A 'check list' for professionals

Books of Account
A Practitioner’s Guide to Audit of Small Entities
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India
( http://www.icai.org/ )

The ‘small’ guide

A software company with nearly Rs 60 crore of revenues states in its recent ‘results’ ad that it is ‘engaged primarily in the business of export of software services’ and that there is ‘no separate reportable segment as per Accounting Standard (AS) 17.’
A group company of a public-sector oil giant makes a similar assertion — that it operates only ‘one segment, petroleum sector’ — though its gross sales for the most recent quarter were close to Rs 100 crore.

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PingCo, another Hotmail!

Books 2 Byte
Silicon Dragon: How China is winning the tech race
Rebecca A. Fannin
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Writing on the wall

Move over, Skype, because here comes PingCo, advises Rebecca A. Fannin in Silicon Dragon: How China is winning the tech race. “PingCo, which is shorthand for Personal Information Next Generation, or ‘ping,’ as in ‘ping me’ (‘send me a message’), promises to be a killer application for wireless communications,” she predicts. “It could be the next new thing that feeds consumers’ appetite for more. It also breeds addictive behaviour.”

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Creating 'television spaces'

Books 2 Byte
World Television: From Global to Local
Joseph D. Straubhaar
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Technology in TV

One key limit on access to television is economic capital, says Joseph D. Straubhaar in World Television: From Global to Local. “Even though people buy televisions before stoves, refrigerators, or indoor plumbing, hundreds of millions in the world still cannot afford a television,” he notes.

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‘Knowledge is power’, share it!

Books 2 Byte
Strategic Human Resource Management
Michael Armstrong
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

KM needs trust

Knowledge management (KM) is as much, if not more, concerned with people and how they acquire, exchange and disseminate knowledge as it is about information technology, says Michael Armstrong in Strategic Human Resource Management third edition. KM is both about stocks and flows of knowledge, he elaborates. “Stocks include expertise and encoded knowledge in computer systems. Flows represent the ways in which knowledge is transferred from people to people or from people to a knowledge database.”

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'On a third-party payroll'

Books 2 Byte
Temping: an introduction
B.V.S. Prasad and K. Sangeetha
( http://www.icfaipress.org/)

Versatile temps

The Human resource outsourcing (HRO) market is pegged at $140 billion globally, informs an essay in Temping: an introduction, edited by B.V.S. Prasad and K. Sangeetha. While internationally the HRO concept has been quantified as giving a 30-40 per cent savings to HR departments, closer home, the benefits from HRO seem to have made good business sense for IT bigwigs such as Oracle, TI, MindTree Consulting, and Reliance Infocomm that have utilised temping staff.

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Defining a business model

Books 2 Byte
Service-Oriented Architecture for Enterprise Applications
Shankar Kambhampaty
( http://www.wileyindia.com/)

Communication between services

Business agility, shorter development cycles, reduced time-to-market, lower total cost of ownership, strategic architecture, alignment of IT and business, and interoperability are among the benefits of SOA (service-oriented architecture) that Shankar Kambhampaty lists in Service-Oriented Architecture for Enterprise Applications. The author explains SOA as an architecture style that supports communication between services.

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Sunday, May 25, 2008

Three paradoxes to become a 'JEA' leader

Say Cheek
Just Enough Anxiety
Robert H. Rosen
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

‘Healthy anxiety’ positive force for growth

Nervousness, worry, concern, unease, apprehension, disquiet, fretfulness, nervousness and angst. These are all synonyms of ‘anxiety’, a word that has its origin in Latin anxius, meaning ‘uneasy, troubled in mind,’ from ang(u)ere ‘choke, cause distress,’ as http://www.etymonline.com/ informs.
Despite its not-so-welcome nature, anxiety can be your ally if it is in the right measure, says Robert H. Rosen. “If you let it overwhelm you, it will turn to panic. If you deny or run from it, you will become complacent,” he writes in Just Enough Anxiety.

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The two raw ingredients in a venture

Book Value
Venture Design
Anne Marie Knott
( http://www.sagepublications.com/ )

Entrepreneur plus idea

The two raw ingredients in a venture are the entrepreneur and the idea, says Anne Marie Knott in Venture Design. The primary impetus for entrepreneurship is an economic push, she adds. “Acquisitions and terminations are probably the most powerful predictors of entrepreneurship, because they imply relevant experience and financial assets necessary to start a venture, but other transitions are predictive as well: divorce, graduation, leaving prison.”

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Self-employment, the best way to make money

Book Value
Real Success Without a Real Job
Ernie J. Zelinski
( http://www.macmillanindia.com/ )

Work for ‘the best boss’

If, at work, you don’t feel listened to, your work is unappreciated, you are underpaid, and you have been overlooked for a promotion while someone less creative and productive has been awarded the job, it is quite likely that you may begin to wonder why you are there.
In which case, you may be a prime candidate to join the league of the self-employed, and start working for ‘the best boss in the world,’ suggests Ernie J. Zelinski in ‘Real Success Without a Real Job’.

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The protecting and growing of the wealth

Book Value
Wealth
Associates of Merrill Lynch and Capgemini
Wiley ( http://www.wiley.com/)

Four pillars of wealth management

The world is witnessing the greatest period of wealth accumulation in history, declares ‘Wealth,’ a new book written by associates of Merrill Lynch and Capgemini. “Never before have so many people from so many different regions of the earth become so wealthy in so short a period of time.” Only during one year out of the last decade — 20 00 — has the number of HNWIs (high net-worth individuals) and their assets actually declined, the book informs.

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The 'explosive' equation

Book Mark
Outrageous Business Growth
Debbie Bermont
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Begin with ‘internal prosperity’

The simple success formula that Debbie Bermont offers right at the start of Outrageous Business Growth is ‘You + Customer = $$$$.’ Simple equation, but ‘explosive,’ avers Bermont.
There are, however, three principles behind the formula, she adds. One, develop an internal prosperity consciousness; two, align yourself only with people who want to buy your products and services; and three, build and maintain lifetime relationships with people who are aligned with your business, explains Bermont.

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The internal triggers

Book Mark
The 7 Triggers to Yes
Russell H. Granger
(http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

It takes emotion to motivate action

The three main elements of every persuasive argument or presentation are ethos, logos, and pathos, says Aristotle. “Incredibly prescient, he got the elements right,” writes Russell H. Granger in The 7 Triggers to Yes. Ethos is the credibility, the knowledge, the expertise and the stature of the speaker, explains Granger.

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Line-sized thoughts

Book Mark
Brainstorming for Creativity and Innovation
Promod and Vijay Batra
( http://www.macmillanindia.com/)

Poster lessons

There lived an old man with a rowboat and he ferried passengers across a mile-wide river for, say, a couple of rupees. “When asked ‘How many times a day do you do this? he said, ‘As many times as I can, because the more I go, the mo re I get. And if I don’t go, I don’t get.’” That’s all you need to know – all there is to know – about business, economics, prosperity, self-respect and stress reduction, write Promod and Vijay Batra in Brainstorming for Creativity and Innovation.

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Monday, May 19, 2008

The four 'overlapping circles'

Manage Mentor
Totally Aligned Organisation
Raghu Ananthanarayanan
( http://www.pqp.in/)

Human waste

The womb of all organisational wastes is ‘human waste,’ writes Raghu Ananthanarayanan in Totally Aligned Organisation. He assures that organisations supporting initiatives like ‘zero defect’, lean, JIT (just-in-time), TQM (total quality management) and so on can also ensure a 100 per cent deployment of human potential by becoming TAOs (totally aligned orga nisations).

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BGP, a path-vector protocol

Books 2 Byte
CCNP Self-Study: Building Scalable Cisco Internetworks (BSCI)
Catherine Paquet and Diane Teare
( http://www.pearsoned.co.in/)

Border gateway protocol

What they routinely do at Wagah may remind you of ‘border gateway protocol’ between India and Pakistan. But to those who are deep in the world of communications, BGP is likely to ring a different bell. “The Internet is becoming a vital resource in many organisations, resulting in redundant connections to multiple ISPs (Internet service providers). With multiple connections, BGP (border gateway protocol) is an alternative to using default routes to control path selections,” write Catherine Paquet and Diane Teare in CCNP Self-Study: Building Scalable Cisco Internetworks (BSCI), second edition.

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The cross-functional taskforce approach

Books 2 Byte
Strategic Human Resource Technologies
Ashok Chanda
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Empowered teams

In 1988, AT&T was developing its cordless phone, and hoped to reduce the product development time by 50 per cent. “The main obstacle that the company was facing was a tightly-formed hierarchical structure,” narrates Ashok Chanda in Strategic Human Resource Technologies.

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‘The A-Z of managing people successfully'

Books 2 Byte
Superboss
David Freemantle
( http://www.jaicobooks.com/)

Super-communication

As a boss you may be routinely sending down the organisation pipeline tonnes of e-mail to your staff, and expecting their problems to disappear. Alas, such naiveté rests on the blind assumption that if you tell your employees what the company’s problems are, if you tell them ‘the facts,’ they will understand, observes David Freemantle in Superboss. “In organisations rife with distrust, top-down communication campaigns will always be perceived by employees as company propaganda and brain washing,” he adds.

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'The 11g enhancements'

Books 2 Byte
Oracle Database 11g SQL
Jason Price
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Blobs of LOB

The phrase ‘large objects’ may bring to your mind aircraft carriers and giant boulders, outsized books and packaging cartons. But LOBs, as they are abbreviated in Oracle Database 8, are for storing binary data (containing images, music, video, documents, executables and so on), and character data. “LOBs can store up to 128 terabytes of data, depending on the database configuration,” explains Jason Price in Oracle Database 11g SQL.

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The other side of 'Net' surfing

Books 2 Byte
Protect Your Child on the Internet
John Lenardon
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Trust but verify

If your child is viewing material or talking to people he or she knows you would not approve of, there might be certain warning signs, cautions John Lenardon in Protect Your Child on the Internet. Some of the ‘general signs’ include the following: “Your child quickly turns off the computer or changes the computer screen when you enter the room. You discover your child is hiding CDs or DVDs from you.

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Short and long term memory

Book Value
The Brain: A beginner’s guide
Ammar Al-Chalabi, Martin R. Turner, and R. Shane Delamont
( http://www.vivabooksindia.com/ )

Know your memory

The simplest division of memory is into short and long term, write Ammar Al-Chalabi, Martin R. Turner, and R. Shane Delamont in ‘The Brain: A beginner’s guide’. The authors also speak of a third type, the sensory memory, where all information received by the senses is stored before being passed to the conscious mind and stored in short-term memory.

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Poverty vs prosperity

Book Value
Why You’re Dumb, Sick & Broke… And how to get Smart, Healthy & Rich
Randy Gage
( http://www.pentagon-press.com/ )

Your true nature

Prosperity is created in the mind first, declares Randy Gage in ‘Why You’re Dumb, Sick & Broke… And how to get Smart, Healthy & Rich’. “All the good you wish to manifest already exists as an ideal in your mind on the superconscious level,” he explains. “Your prosperity comes from the power stored within you, waiting for your demand. Now, to manifest your good on the physical plane, it is necessary for you to build a bridge between these realms.”

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The basics of Business finance

Book Value
Naked Finance
David Meckin
( http://www.nicholasbrealey.com/)

Drilling down to the basics

Business finance ‘pure and simple’ comes alive in David Meckin’s ‘Naked Finance’. He strips the commonly fuzzy concepts such as profit and costs, cash flow and projects, down to the basics, ‘to provide a clear, unimpeded view of the world of financial management and how it works.’ For instance, Meckin explains bala nce sheet as a powerful document presenting ‘a calculation of wealth.’ The first point to note on a balance sheet is the date, he guides. “When you value something, it is always at a point in time.”

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'A silver-lining behind failures'

Book Value
How to Get Rich
Felix Dennis
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Fear of failure

If you want to get rich, you have to conquer the King Kong of your nightmares, the 800 lb gorilla, ‘the fear of failure,’ advises Felix Dennis in ‘How to Get Rich’. “In the living room, in the pub, in the office, at the boardroom table. Everywhere you look, you will find men and women who appear to take perverse pleasure in pointing out the shriekingly obvious: that if a new venture does not succeed, it may result in failure.”

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Thursday, May 15, 2008

‘Proper way to study people’

E-Dimension
Gang Leader for a Day
Sudhir Venkatesh
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Black and poor?

Entrenched poverty, domestic violence, the prevalence of guns, and such other sociological issues in the community didn’t interest Sudhir Venkatesh. As a research student in the University of Chicago, he wanted to study in-depth the Black Kings crack gang, but inside out, not outside in.
“The field of sociology had long been divided into two camps: those who use quantitative and statistical techniques and those who study life by direct observation, often living among a group of people,” he writes in Gang Leader for a Day.

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About 'derivatives'

Books of Account
Financial Instruments Standards: A Guide on IAS 32, IAS 39 and IFRS 7
Pooja Gupta
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/ )

Guide to complexity

The recent noise about the risks of derivatives, the losses suffered by companies, and the urgent pronouncements by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI) on financial instruments and revenue recognition predictably triggered a panicky focus on the accounting of financial instruments.
During the 1990s the accounting standards did not keep pace with market derivatives activities, Pooja Gupta writes at the start of her book Financial Instruments Standards: A Guide on IAS 32, IAS 39 and IFRS 7.

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The 'awesome' bank!

Books of Account
Secrets of Swiss Banking
Hoyt Barber
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Safe and secret

If you are looking for the ultimate investment plan, the best asset protection structure in the world, and the finest way to silently build your fortune, Hoyt Barber’s Secrets of Swiss Banking may help.
For, what should matter to individuals is the financial security that the destination offers, even while the big picture — that this ‘quaint alpine oasis’ manages almost 40 per cent of the world’s private assets — is awesome, as the author argues.

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The impact of a tariff

Book Mark
International Trade and Economic Development
Sugata Marjit
( http://www.oup.com/)

Protecting consumers through protection

One of the research essays in International Trade and Economic Development edited by Sugata Marjit is titled ‘Protecting Consumers Through Protection: The Role of Tariff-Based T echnology Transfer.’ A well-directed restrictive trade policy can increase the overall welfare of the country and also help consumers get a better price, the essay notes.

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Loyalty vs profitability

Book Mark
Managing Customers for Profit
V. Kumar
( http://www.pearsoned.co.in/)

Loyalty does not automatically ensure profitability

Neil Kinnock’s quote - that loyalty is a fine quality, but in excess it fills political graveyards - may well apply to marketing too. “In spite of the overwhelming presence of loyalty programmes in virtually every industry, firms implemen ting them have tended to overlook certain important limitations, often to the detriment of company profitability,” writes V. Kumar in Managing Customers for Profit.

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Trade shows, an effective promotional method

Book Mark
Star Trek: The Fascinating Journey of Entrepreneurship in Tamil Nadu
Syed Zakir Ahmed
( http://www.cii.in/)

Effective promotion

Trade shows are a powerful medium because they touch all the five senses, says Syed Zakir Ahmed, CMD of ZAK Trade Fairs and Exhibitions. And, as a promotional method, trade shows are “the most effective as you can measure your returns immediate ly.”
Though Delhi is the traditional hub of the trade fair and event management scene, Zakir is of the view that the South has a huge advantage, owing to its well-entrenched and developed industries such as automobile, textile, engineering, manufacturing, software and other sectors.

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Monday, May 12, 2008

Visualising the consequences of inaction

Soft Skills
The Power of Focus for College Students
Les Hewitt, Andrew Hewitt and Luc d’Abadie
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Four ways to fight procrastination

Decisions alone do not guarantee action; you need to ‘grab the wheel and hit the gas,’ urges ‘The Power of Focus for College Students’. wo major roadblocks that prevent most people from taking action are procrastination and fear, say the book’s authors Les Hewitt, Andrew Hewitt and Luc d’Abadie.
“Procrastination is doing things that bring you immediate pleasure instead of focusing on your priorities,” the authors explain.

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Tips to overcome the predicament

Manage Mentor
What Got You Here Won’t Get You There
Marshall Goldsmith
( http://www.vivagroupindia.com/)

Behaviour bottlenecks

You may think you have all the answers but to others that may reek of arrogance. You think you are contributing to a situation with helpful comments; others see you as butting in. You pat yourself for effective delegation, not knowing that behind your back your colleagues see you as shirking responsibilities. You think you are holding your tongue, but others take it as unresponsiveness…
These are some of the situations that Marshall Goldsmith paints in What Got You Here Won’t Get You.

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The 'in-groups' and 'out-groups'

Books 2 Byte
Understanding Cross-Cultural Psychology
Pittu D. Laungani
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Steer clear of stereotyping

As employers of people with increasingly diverse backgrounds, it is necessary that our companies, more so the ones in the IT sector, ensure that work environments are free from stereotypes. A stereotype, for starters, is “a negative, unpleasant value-laden judgment that we often form of another individual or a group that we see as being ‘different’ from ours,” as Pittu D. Laungani defines in Understanding Cross-Cultural Psychology.

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The desk, ‘the laptop of luxury’ for bacteria

Books 2 Byte
Great Myth Conceptions
Dr Karl Kruszelnicki
( http://www.harpercollins.co.in/)

Dangerous desktops

If you regularly eat and drink at your desk, it may shock you to know that the desk on average “has 50 times more bacteria per square centimetre than a toilet seat.” This, in essence, was the finding of a study conducted in August 2001 by Dr Charles Gerba, a microbiologist from the University of Arizona, and his team. They looked for five different types of bacteria, viz. E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Streptococcus, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus, recounts Dr Karl Kruszelnicki in Great Myth Conceptions.

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Indian IT-BPO, leading the spectrum of industries

Books 2 Byte
Strategic Review 2008: The IT-BPO sector in India
( http://www.nasscom.in/)

IT challenges

At $64 billion today, the Indian IT-BPO market (including domestic and export revenues across hardware, software, IT services, BPO and engineering services) accounts for less than 3 per cent of the worldwide spends, notes Strategic Review 2008: The IT-BPO sector in India. With the global sourcing penetration estimated to be growing at nearly four times the rate of worldwide software and services spends, the report sees immense opportunities for the rapid growth of the Indian share of the pie.

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An optimistic forecast!

Books 2 Byte
Wireless: The latest telecom story
Mohan Sundara Rajan
( http://www.nbtindia.org.in/)

Too cheap to meter

The facility to access the Internet in a wireless mode, possibly without charge and in a mobile mode, using systems such as WiFi and WiMAX, holds the promise of bringing broadband communications to rural areas in developing countries, says Mohan Sundara Rajan in Wireless: The latest telecom story.

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A step towards 3G networks

Books 2 Byte
2.5G Mobile Networks: GPRS and EDGE
Sumit Kasera, Nishit Narang, and A.P. Priyanka( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

The GPRS edge

The GPRS (general packet radio services) core network has two types of entities, viz. databases (or registers) and routers, says 2.5G Mobile Networks: GPRS and EDGE by Sumit Kasera, Nishit Narang, and A.P. Priyanka. They explain how “GPRS emerged as the first genuine packet-based wireless technology,” by reserving RR (radio resources) only when data is sent, in services such as Internet access. An important advantage of GPRS, the authors observe, is that it provides a migration step towards 3G (third generation) networks.

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Users, the biggest threat to the computers

Books 2 Byte
Enterprise Security
Rajat Khare and Varun Srivastava
( http://www.bpbonline.com/)

Demand security from software vendors

The downside of being in a highly connected network is that we are all connected with the best and the worst of security, observe Rajat Khare and Varun Srivastava in Enterprise Security. “The best we can do is to manage the risks: employ technological and procedural mitigation while at the same time allowing businesses to thrive,” they argue.

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Develop a 'creative' brain!

Book Value
Why So Stupid?
Edward de Bono
(Westland)

Recognition to design

The brain is a self-organising information system, says Edward de Bono in ‘Why So Stupid?’ (Westland). Incoming information organises itself into patterns, just like rain falling on a landscape gradually organises itself into streams and rivers, he analogises. “Once formed these streams and rivers collect and capture all future rainfall. In the same way, the patterns formed in the brain determine our future perceptions.”

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Mergers and acquisitions

Book Value
A to Z of Business Strategy
A.V. Vedpuriswar
( http://www.visionbooksindia.com/ )

Business lexicon

There are different ways to value a company, such as market price of shares, replacement cost of assets, and present value of the future expected cash flows. Ultimately, however, valuation is a subjective exercise that is as much art as science, says A.V. Vedpuriswar in ‘A to Z of Business Strategy’ . In an entry on ‘merger,’ he explains different types of merger, viz. horizontal, vertical, and conglomerate. “Many mergers fail to create value for shareholders because synergies identified before the merger fail to materialise,” the author adds.

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'Find out where your time goes'

Book Value
Simple Ways to Manage Stress
Promod Batra
( http://www.macmillanindia.com/ )

Beat the stress

Each of us cannot do great things, but each of us can do small things in a big way, assures Promod Batra in ‘Simple Ways to Manage Stress,’ second. “I get my inspiration from the wonderful saying that if a litre can hold a litre of oil, that is wonderful!” he writes. “To expect it hold a gallon is to merely become stressful. Most of us do just the opposite. We want a litre to hold much more than a litre.”

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Expensive 'playing'

Book Value
101 Investment Lessons from the Wizards of Wall Street
Michael Sincere
( http://www.jaicobooks.com/)

Getting rich slowly

One of the diktats in Michael Sincere’s ‘101 Investment Lessons from the Wizards of Wall Street’ is, ‘Don’t trade stocks when you’re distracted.’ If you are distracted by family problems, dreaming about your next vacation or feeling rushed, it is easy to make careless trading errors, he cautions. “Not only should you avoid trading when you can’t concentrate, but you should also be careful about trading when you feel desperate to win back money you lost on other stocks.”

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Thursday, May 08, 2008

A list of board functions

Books of Account
The Board Book
William G. Bowen
( http://www.wwnorton.com/ )

What do boards do?

There can be no dispute that the single overarching responsibility of all boards is to build an effective organisation. This happens through eight principal functions that boards perform, says William G. Bowen in The Board Book. The first of these functions is to select, encourage, advise, evaluate, compensate, and, if need be, replace the CEO. “A sometimes underappreciated (and less understood) function of boards is to give informal advice to the CEO or president outside of board meetings,” Bowen observes.

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Ways to cleverly catch the recipient’s attention

Book Mark
The Golden Apple
Kathy Aaronson
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Speed bumps

This is a busy world, and unless you build speed bumps into every transaction, nobody is going to listen to what you have to offer, says Kathy Aaronson in The Golden Apple. “Speed bumps create receptivity whether you’re seeking a job, running for office, selling a product or service, or seeking acceptance of your project or idea,” she advises.

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The life of millionaire business families

Book Mark
Representing India
Mukesh Williams and Rohit Wanchoo
( http://www.oup.com/)

Business soaps

The TV serials of today are more exciting and more opulent than they were two decades ago, depicting stories about people who are extraordinarily rich and successful, say Mukesh Williams and Rohit Wanchoo in Representing India. “It is interesting that the greatest expansion in the size of the Indian middle class - rising from 100 million to nearly 250 million people - has actually created this inordinate fascination with the life of millionaire business families.”

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Economic boom

Book Mark
Think India
Vinay Rai and William L. Simon
( http://www.penguin.com/)

Mumbai, the economy’s epicentre

You meet ‘a slumbering giant’ awakening, in Chapter 3 of Think India by Vinay Rai and William L. Simon. “India’s six million luxury consumers are now f uriously shucking out some $15 billion a year for diamond-encrusted watches, flashy cars, designer clothing, pricey cosmetics, perfumes, and high-tech gadgetry from digital cameras to Internet-connecting phones.

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Monday, May 05, 2008

An innovation team

Say Cheek
The Game-Changer
Ram Charan and A.G. Lafley
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Teams need deadlines because constraints spur creativity

Innovation is a team sport, cheers a new book from Ram Charan, a leading global management guru. Innovation comes not just from thinking up new ideas, but from combining and recombining them, and then putting together the people who can turn concept into reality, he says in ‘The Game-Changer’, co-written with A.G. Lafley.
“Just as a sports team has certain defined positions – quarterback, kicker, tackle – so must an innovation team,” the authors argue. The ‘idea generator’ is a key player in the innovation team, with ability ‘to push beyond the plausible to create provocative ideas.’

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Successful management of time and energy

Manage Mentor
Executive Stamina
Marty and Joshua Seldman
( http://www.wiley.com/)

Find your career ‘sweet spot’

Check if one or more of the following phrases come close to describing you: low energy and enthusiasm, decline in listening skills, weakened immune system, impulsive and short-term decision-making, inadequate emotional control, narrowed focus and reduced flexibility, lack of organisational savvy and political awareness, work stress leading to family stress, and development of addictions. If yes, what you may badly require is Executive Stamina by Marty and Joshua Seldman ( http://www.wiley.com/).

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