Monday, April 28, 2008

Ways to achieve a 'good' change

Manage Mentor
It Starts with One
J. Stewart Black and Hal B. Gregersen
( http://www.pearsoned.co.in/)

Three barriers to change

The low success rate and conversely high failure rate of any change effort is due to three strong barriers, viz. see, move and finish, says a new book by two INSEAD experts, J. Stewart Black and Hal B. Gregersen. “If we can understand the nature of each of these three barriers, we can make the needed adjustments to achieve breakthrough change,” they assure in It Starts with One.

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'Net set, faster than the jet set'

Books 2 Byte
The Cybergypsies
Indra Sinha
(http://www.simonsays.co.uk/)

Explorers of cyberspace

Satanbug: On this eerie note Indra Sinha begins The Cybergypsies . "The satellite relay kicks in." And you meet Geno Paris, the self-styled `technopath,' who is the proprietor of one of the biggest virus collections on the Net: "all the common viruses you'll find on any bug-exchange bulletin board, plus hundreds of exotic specimens, various unidentified species culled from the wild and not a few he has written himself. He has links to every major partisan group in the virus underground."

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The 'bloggers'

Books 2 Byte
Ultimate Blogs
Sarah Boxer
(http://www.vintagebooks.com/)

Call of the blogosphere

Eurotrash, Language Log, Micrographica, Ironic Sans, Cosmic Variance, Click Opera, The Smoking Gun. plus a score more finds from `the wild web' have been anthologised in Ultimate Blogs edited by Sarah Boxer. Her choice of bloggers is diverse - in terms of nationality, sex, age, genre (nonfiction, fiction, poetry, comics and photography), subject (culture, public policy, cosmology, fashion, family, motherhood, literature, and so on), popularity, and blog name (eponymous, epithetical, prepositional, imperative, and declarative).

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'Golden rules' about e-mails

Books 2 Byte
Send
David Shipley and Will Schwalbe
(http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Why e-mail can fail

Before you click to open your inbox, it may help to know that bad things happen on e-mail, as rues a new book. E-mail can go awry, and our difficulties with e-mail can't simply be blamed on its youth, write David Shipley and Will Schwalbe in Send. The book grapples with many questions, such as: "Why do we send so many electronic messages that we never should have written? Why do things spin out of control so quickly? Why don't people remember that e-mail leaves an indelible electronic record? Why do we forget to compose our messages carefully so that people will know what we want without having to guess?"

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The 'debt' numbers!

Book Value
Symmetry: A Journey into the Patterns of Nature
Marcus Du Sautoy
( http://www.harpercollins.com/ )

Negative numbers

It was mathematicians in India who put negative numbers on the mathematical map, says Marcus Du Sautoy in ‘Symmetry: A Journey into the Patterns of Nature’. “Along with the concept of zero, they saw the potential of introducing new numbers to solve equations such as x+3=1. They called these numbers ‘debts’ because they represented a useful way of denoting money that one person owed another,” he narrates.

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Time management

Book Value
The Life Audit
Caroline Righton
( http://www.thelifeaudit.com/)

Return on minutes

Every minute counts, so take control of your life, urges Caroline Righton in ‘The Life Audit’ . “The minutes of each day are your currency, and it is important that you have a clear idea about where you are spending your time in the present,” she exhorts. The quality of your waking hours can often be measured by the company you keep, the author guides, in a section titled ‘relationship stocktake.’ There is nothing more debilitating than a painful relationship that sucks your soul dry and leaves you feeling a lesser person, she warns.

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Ethical behaviour in business

Book Value
The Story of Success: Five Steps to Mastering Ethics in Business
Leigh Hafrey
( http://www.ravemedia.in/ )

Ethics in numbers

While it is hard to say at what point good manners become ethical behaviour, given the centrality of social norms to both, etiquette without ethics is an empty gesture, form without meaning, bemoans Leigh Hafrey in ‘The Story of Success: Five Steps to Mastering Ethics in Business’ . He argues that ethics as a subject contributes most to the MBA curriculum precisely in that it adds substance and integrity to the notions of effective communication and effective practice in organisations.

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Change the way of thinking

Book Value
God Does Not Play Dice
David A. Shiang
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Eliminate the ‘what if’ worry

Five words that can literally change your life forever, according to David A. Shiang, are: “You cannot affect the future.” The only future outcome that can occur is the outcome that will occur, he writes in ‘God Does Not Play Dice’. “Few of us will find it easy to accept this notion – most of us want to be in full control of our own destinies. We want to think of ‘endless possibilities’ in a world where we are completely free to do as we please,” Shiang acknowledges. He argues, however, that we have all the free will that we need (which is zero). “We just may not have as much as we want.”

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Friday, April 25, 2008

‘More for less’

Book Mark
Advertising in Modern & Postmodern Times
Pamela Odin
( http://www.sagepublications.com/)

Media-saturated economy

Convergence technologies offer advertising its potential of operating at the epicentre of our media-saturated economy of signs, opines Pamela Odin in Advertising in Modern & Postmodern Times. “Multimedia advertising is the material realisation of capitalism’s insatiable appetite for time/space efficiency in the expropriation of ‘more for less’,” she describes.

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The 12 laws for leaders

Book Mark
Rules to Break & Laws to Follow
Peppers and Rogers
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Customers are scarcer than capital

The first of the 12 laws that Don Peppers and Martha Rogers lay down for leaders is to create the most possible value from the available customers and prospects. Customers are the only source of organic growth for a company, and they are scarcer than capital, the authors grimly observe. “Your financial budget is an artificial scarcity of money, an imposed constraint on your activities, but your ‘customer budget’ is an actual scarcity of customers,” write Peppers and Rogers in Rules to Break & Laws to Follow, a new book in the Microsoft Executive Leadership Series.

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Maintaining a good customer relationship

Book Mark
The Satisfied Customer
Claes Fornell
( http://www.palgrave.com/)

Portfolio of customers

In an economy where buyers are getting more powerful at the expense of sellers, good management of customer relationships is becoming an essential ingredient for economic value creation, proposes Claes Fornell in The Satisfied Customer. As buyers become increasingly empowered, investors are going to pay more attention to the quality of a firm’s customer relationships, he foresees.

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Monday, April 21, 2008

Change your feelings with words

Write Right
Covert Persuasion
Kevin Hogan and James Speakman
(http://www.landmarkonthenet.com)

Mood-transforming vocabulary

The 12 most persuasive words in English are, “You, money, save, results, health, easy, love, discovery, proven, new, safety, and guarantee,” say Kevin Hogan and James Speakman in Covert Persuasion (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com). In marketing, you might want to add ‘this dozen,’ the authors suggest: “Free, yes, fast, why, how, secrets, sale, now, power, announcing, benefits, and solution.”
Millions of words have been written about how the human brain works and how we think, but the secret to persuading someone else to your way of thinking is to align your mind with theirs, the book advises.

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Expedition to the food kingdom

Say Cheek
Around the World in 80 Dinners: The Ultimate Culinary Adventure
Cheryl and Bill Jamison
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Gastronomic expedition as anniversary treat

When Cheryl and Bill Jamison of the US decided to celebrate their 20th wedding anniversary by going round the world on the strength of their frequent-flier miles, India was definitely on the agenda. But there was a problem: ‘the whole enormous country’ enticed them.
Cheryl made a strong pitch for Agra, the site of the Taj Mahal, and Bill pushed Khajuraho, ‘a three-dimensional version of the Kama Sutra,’ as the two recount in Around the World in 80 Dinners: The Ultimate Culinary Adventure ( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/).

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'People first, customers second'

Manage Mentor
Death to all Sacred Cows
David Bernstein, Beau Fraser, and Bill Schwab
http://www.landmarkonthenet/)

Decimate the debilitating diktats

Here are a few maxims that are etched in the minds of many in business: “Always trust your research. Teams create the best solutions. Follow the leader. Success breeds success. It’s okay to put up with jerks if they’re talented.”
These pithy edicts are ‘repeated and sanctified and followed blindly by employees and management throughout the world,’ but it is time to take a hard look at these debilitating diktats before decisively decimating them, advises Death to all Sacred Cows (http://www.landmarkonthenet/).

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People who love their work

Reading Room
Ugly Duckling
Amita Mukerjee
( http://www.revengeink.com/)

Interpretation of interest in translation work

Meet Mia Makarand narrating her tale as a Paris-based translator and interpreter in Amita Mukerjee’s Ugly Duckling (http://www.revengeink.com). “I just did the minimum nĂ©cessaire and went to work and sat there like a cement sack. Then I interpreted like I was in a trance. And when it was done, I got out of there and came home and took as long as I could to recover,” says Mia. In contrast, her colleagues were far more alert and involved.

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Construction of three-dimensional models

Books 2 Byte
The Burnt House
Faye Kellerman
( http://www.harpercollins.co.uk/)

Rapid prototyping

Gruesome air crash. Panic and crisis. With these in prologue begins The Burnt House by Faye Kellerman ( http://www.harpercollins.co.uk/).
While investigating the crash, sleuths are trying to understand rapid prototyping, which is used in the industry to construct models.
“Suppose Ford Motor Company designs an engine block on a computer,” Mike begins to explain, with an example. “Now a computer image is a two-dimensional representation of something three-dimensional.

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‘Facts’ were often articles of faith

Books 2 Byte
Patterns in Network Architecture: A Return to Fundamentals
John Day
( http://www.pearsoned.com/)

Engineering vs science

“A field cannot consider itself a science until it can progress beyond natural history, moving from describing what is, to positing principles or theories that make predictions and impose constraints.”
Thus opens John Day’s Patterns in Network Architecture: A Return to Fundamentals ( http://www.pearsoned.com/). And it shouldn’t be just any theory, he insists. “We need a theory that has the fewest assumptions and the greatest breadth: a theory with the fewest concepts, the fewest special cases.”


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Exploration, exploitation, and exportation

Books 2 Byte
X-Teams
Deborah Ancona and Henrik Bresman
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Secrets of the X-teams

Good teams, made up of talented and committed individuals, may at times, fail or slowly decline. Why? Because the team, which is otherwise good at focusing on its process and problems at hand, can dangerously ignore the task of managing externally, across team boundaries, says a new book from Harvard Business School Press.
“What is needed is an internal focus combined with an external approach,” say Deborah Ancona and Henrik Bresman in X-Teams (http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com). “Team success at leading, innovating, and getting things done means managing both inside and outside the team.”

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Thursday, April 17, 2008

Islamic banking

Books of Account
Islamic Finance: The Regulatory Challenge
Simon Archer and Rifaat Ahmed Abdel Karim
( http://www.wiley.com/ )

Ethical edge of Islamic finance

How and to what extent are Basel II principles and techniques applicable to the regulation and supervision of Islamic banks, and what are the problems to be overcome in this context? These questions find answers in Islamic Finance: The Regulatory Challenge edited by Simon Archer and Rifaat Ahmed Abdel Karim ( http://www.wiley.com/ ).
At least two factors make the book topical. One, the rapid development of Islamic banking since the early 1990s. ‘Islamic Banking a Western Success,’ says Lahem al Nasser in an article dated April 14 (http://aawsat.com).

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The story of 'salesforce.com'

Book Mark
The Rules of Victory
James Gimian and Barry Boyce
( http://www.shambhala.com/)

Maturity of the upstart

Among the many case studies in The Rules of Victory by James Gimian and Barry Boyce (http://www.shambhala.com) is the story of salesforce.com, which “entered into a relatively uncontested mark et – what the Sun Tzu calls ‘unpeopled ground’ – with a new model and business proposition.” The company grew rapidly, solidified its position as the market leader, and proved both the value of the market for on-demand access to software and its ability to exploit that market, the authors explain.

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Good managers watch for potential shifts in profit pools

Book Mark
The Breakthrough Imperative
Mark Gottfredson and Steve Schaubert( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Don’t get stuck in a drying-up profit pool

Customers and profit pools don’t stand still. This is the third law in The Breakthrough Imperative by Mark Gottfredson and Steve Schaubert of Bain & Company (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com). Four drivers behind these shifts, as the authors identify are customer preferences, innovations, bargaining power and business environment.
Consumers “often switch brands or service providers to get a better deal or to improve their image somehow.” For instance, in the US auto market, the operating margins of GM, Ford, Honda and Toyota were within two percentage points of one another, in 1989.

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A museum with the world's finest cars

Book Mark
Trailblazers of Gujarat
Kamlendra Kanwar
(Harmony Publishers)

Vintage enterprise

In a museum called ‘Auto World’ on the outskirts of Ahmedabad are ‘100 of the world’s finest cars – a 1911 Daimler, a 1927 Rolls Royce Phantom 1, a 1927 Hispano-Suiza H6C, a 1931 Auburn V12, a 1932 Studebaker Roadster, a 1936 Cord 810, a 1936 Alvis, a 1937 Mayback SW38, to name a few,’ as Kamlendra Kanwar writes in a chapter on Pranlal Bhogilal, included in Trailblazers of Gujarat (Harmony Publishers).

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Monday, April 14, 2008

The four-phase programme for women

Say Cheek
Ask For It
Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

A nagging voice that drags on in women’s heads

Women can fare far better in life, but for a force that is slowing them down, damaging their self-esteem and costing them money. The villain, according to a new research, is a vicious voice inside the women’s heads, which directs them not to ask for the things they want.
“Talk back to that nagging voice,” urge Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever in ‘Ask For It’ ( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/). “You can ask for more than you’re getting, more than you’re offered, and perhaps even far more than you think it’s possible to get,” they assure.

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Leaders and professionals - face-to-face interaction

Manage Mentor
When Professionals Have to Lead
Thomas J. Delong, John J. Gabarro and Robert J. Lees
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Four leadership activities

Law firms, consulting practices, accounting firms, investment banks and other professional service firms (PSFs) are facing tough demands these days, both internally and externally. “Associates have development needs that often aren’t being met; clients expect firms to be all things to all people, requesting help in areas where firms may have little or no expertise,” write Thomas J. Delong, John J. Gabarro and Robert J. Lees in When Professio nals Have to Lead (http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com).

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'The talent problems'

Books 2 Byte
Talent on Demand
Peter Cappelli
Harvard Business Press

Invest in talent management

The early days of the IT (information technology) industry in the US were dominated by large companies such as IBM, HP, Sperry and Univac, with traditional models of talent management, recounts Peter Cappelli in Talent on Demand, a book from Harvard Business Press, to be released this month.
“A new generation of companies located on Route 128 in Boston led the growth of the industry in the late 1970s and early 1980s: Wang, Data General, and especially Digital Equipment Corporation. Their practices for managing talent were also traditional, with elaborate planning models based on internal development.”

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The Ajax code, in JavaScript

Books 2 Byte
Ajax: Conversations with an Ajaxian
Rajnikant Rao
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Refreshingly different

Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. If that sounds tough, how about Ajax, the acronym coined by Jesse James Garnett? “A whole new approach to Web development,” explains Rajnikant Rao in Ajax: Conversations with an Ajaxian (http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com).
“The tools, as a developer, you use are the same — HTML to display a page, JavaScript to build some intelligence on the browser side, and a server-side scripting using Java, PHP, Visual Basic, etc. for backend processing.”

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The feeling of a reciprocated relationship

Books 2 Byte
Fl!p
Peter Sheahan
( http://www.harpercollins.co.uk/)

High-tech can be high-touch

The site of First Direct (http://www.firstdirect.com), the online banking subsidiary of HSBC in the UK, opens with a teaser: ‘£100 if you like us… £200 if you don’t.’ An inside page explains how: “Switch to ‘first direct’ and we’ll give you £100. If you’re not happy after six months we’ll help you move to another bank and give you another £100.”
Equally interesting should be this snatch from Peter Sheahan’s Fl!p (http://www.harpercollins.co.uk) about another customer-friendly service from the company: it sends an SMS to its customers when they are approaching their credit limits to save them embarrassment when they try to make a purchase they can’t afford, and also to spare them unwanted overdraft fees.

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On ‘intelligent investments’

Book Value
Managing Your Investments
A. Besant C. Raj
( http://www.everonn.com/ )

Don’t mix up strategies

Irrespective of the lower figures quoted by Government sources, inflation in the economy can be safely estimated at around 10 per cent, says A. Besant C. Raj in ‘Managing Your Investments’ (http://www.everonn.com). If savings are not deployed at least at the rate of inflation, we will lose our purchasing power, he argues.

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'Do you want other people to invest their time, energy and money in your idea?'

Book Value
Good in a Room
Stephanie Palmer
( http://www.currencybooks.com/ )

Pitch right

The strategies and tactics that people use for selling ideas in Hollywood work in the rest of the business world, writes Stephanie Palmer in ‘Good in a Room’ ( http://www.currencybooks.com/ ). The title phrase is a Hollywood term referring to creative people who excel at pitching in high-stakes meetings, she explains. “During my time as a studio executive at MGM, I had over three thousand pitch meetings where writers, directors, stars, and producers would try to persuade me to buy their ideas.”

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'Think about cash flow, not earnings'

Book Value
Invest Like a Dealmaker
Christopher Mayer
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Two markets for stocks

Investing done right is inherently circumstance-based, says Christopher Mayer in ‘Invest Like a Dealmaker’ (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com).
“There is no ratio or number you are aiming to find – no price-to-earnings ratio hurdles or growth rates or anything like that. Instead, you’re looking for scenarios or circumstances in which things are happening that could make you some money,” he advises. These are often outside-the-box opportunities that mainstream investors would never consider because they lack the attributes that these investors latch on to, adds Mayer.

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'A positive attitude of mind has a big influence on the course of a cancer'

Bill of Health
Cancer is a word, not a sentence
Dr Robert Buckman
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Myths about cancer

Whenever we see something we don’t understand, we tend to ascribe a hidden cause to it, bemoans Dr Robert Buckman in Cancer is a word, not a sentence (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com). “Before the modern era, ulcerative colitis was thought to be caused by an obsessive personality, schizophrenia by a dysfunctional family, and Down’s syndrome, a chromosomal abnormality, by the parents being intoxicated at the moment of conception!”

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Friday, April 11, 2008

Consciousness should be raised for freedom

E-Dimension
The Mind of the Market
Michael Shermer
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Economics isn’t dismal

Does the world seem bleak on your crystal ball? Is all hope for a gushing economy ominously getting lost in the dreary desert sands of depressing politics? Take heart. “In the long run, no dictator, demagogue, priest, president, or any other pretender to power will be able to control the Googlification, Wikification, eBayification, MapQuestificaiton, YouTubification, MySpacification of information, knowledge, geography, personal relationships, markets, and the economy.”
Thus forecasts Michael Shermer in The Mind of the Market (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com), a new book sub-titled, ‘Compassionate apes, competitive humans, and other tales from evolutionary economics.’

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Thursday, April 10, 2008

The levying of a 'war surtax'

Books of Account
The Three Trillion Dollar War: The true cost of the Iraq conflict
Joseph Stiglitz and Linda Bilmes
( http://www.penguin.com/ )

The black hole called war

There is no free lunch, so too there are no free wars, declares Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz in a new book. “In one way or another, we will pay these bills,” he bemoans in The Three Trillion Dollar War: The true cost of the Iraq conflict (http://www.penguin.com) co-written with Linda Bilmes.
“At the onset of the Iraq war, the US government was already running a deficit,” begins a section on the conflict’s costs to the US Budget. No new taxes have been levied; there were in fact tax cuts especially for the upper-income Americans, shortly after the war started, the authors remind.

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Monday, April 07, 2008

The important aspects of ‘leader’

Say Cheek
Total Leadership
Stewart D. Friedman
Harvard Business Press book ( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Think of life as a jazz quartet

Work, home, community, and self. Are you succeeding in one of these aspects of life while underperforming in the rest? Or are you failing to capture value from one part of life and bringing it to bear in others, or living with too much conflict among your different roles? If the answer is ‘yes,’ here is help from Stewart D. Friedman in ‘Total Leadership’, a soon-to-be-released Harvard Business Press book (http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com).

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'Don’t fall in love with your own solution to a problem'

Say Cheek
The Breakthrough Company
Keith R. McFarland
(http://www.landmarkonthenet.com)/

Make space for insultants who ask tough questions

Before hiring the next big consultant, think again. You may perhaps be in need of an insultant. An ‘insultant’ is someone willing to ask the tough questions that cause a company to think critically about its fundamental assumptions, defines Keith R. McFarland in The Breakthrough Company (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com)

People defer to authority or rank because they assume that person, the person in authority, is likely to have more information or clearer perspective, says McFarland.

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Psychological foundations for a leadership

Stories Retold
Leaders Who Transform Society
Micha Popper
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Leadership development

With William Wordsworth’s famous line, ‘The child is the father of the man,’ begins a chapter in Micha Popper’s ‘Leaders Who Transform Society’ (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com). “Leadership does not develop in infancy, but that is when the psychological foundations are laid for further development,” says the author, citing many examples, including one about Gandhiji.

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'Be the kind of people others yearn to be'

Manage Mentor
Boom!
Kevin and Jackie Freiberg
(Westland)

Don’t surrender your freedom to choose

Your most powerful attribute is the freedom to choose, exhort Kevin and Jackie Freiberg in Boom! (Westland).
“Freedom is yours for the taking – even at work,” they urge. “But the problem is that we all frequently fail to embrace what is immediately available and already ours.” Why so? Because many people think, “freedom li es ‘out there,’ in a better boss, a more enlightened culture, a different job, a bigger office, or a more solid customer base rather than ‘in here,’ in them,” the authors rue.

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The `Empire'

Books of Account
The Secret History of the American Empire
John Perkins
(http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Bribe engineering

There can be four ways for an engineering company to pay X a `legal bribe' writes John Perkins in The Secret History of the American Empire (www.landmarkonthenet.com). One, the company could arrange to lease bulldozers, cranes, trucks and other heavy equipment from companies owned by X and his friends and pay excessive fees. (X, as you might have guessed, could be a political bigwig who is looking for a `cut' from the `development' project.)

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The components of IT portfolio

Books 2 Byte
IT Portfolio Rationalization
Prashant Halari, Sushil Paigankar, Hitesh Salla and Rajaram Vengurlekar
( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/)

Portfolio approach

Applications, projects, hardware and network assets are the components of IT portfolio, describes IT Portfolio Rationalization by Prashant Halari, Sushil Paigankar, Hitesh Salla and Rajaram Vengurlekar ( http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/).
The authors, who belong to Patni Computers, Mumbai, state that like a financial portfolio, the IT portfolio too must be re-evaluated continually and altered to suit the enterprise’s financial goals.

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The traffic lights and the 'uncooked' egg

Books 2 Byte
Please Explain
Dr Karl Kruszelnicki
( http://www.harpercollins.co.in/)

Push button and ‘mobile’ oven

You have pressed the button for the elevator to arrive, or for the pedestrian crossing to clear, but there is always someone next to you trying to speed things along by incessantly jabbing his finger on the button.
Such people believe that by pressing the button frequently and vigorously the elevator or ‘walk’ sign will take less time to appear. Alas, they’re wrong, says Dr Karl Kruszelnicki in Please Explain (http://www.harpercollins.co.in).

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'Hedging is expensive and dilutes commitment'

Books 2 Byte
Andy Grove
Richard S. Tedlow
( http://www.penguinbooksindia.com/)

Strategy is what we do

What is strategy? Let’s ask the former boss of Intel, Andrew Stephen Grove who, during his tenure as CEO, oversaw ‘a 4,500 per cent increase in the company’s market capitalisation,’ as Wikipedia records.
“In a single word, strategy is action. Strategy is not what we say. Strategy is what we do,” is Grove-speak, as captured by Richard S. Tedlow in Andy Grove ( http://www.penguinbooksindia.com/). “Be quick and dirty. Engage and then plan. And get it better,” elaborates Grove.

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The Secrets of Success

Book Value
The Billion Dollar Book
Yogesh Cholera
(Wonderland Publications, Gujarat)

Rich wisdom

One of the big errors people are making right now, says Carlos Slim Helu, is thinking that old-style businesses will be obsolete. “Some retail groups are introducing e-commerce and think that the ‘bricks’ are no longer useful. But they will continue to be important,” advises the Mexican billionaire.

“Only those who are asleep make no mistakes,” admonishes Ingvar Kamprad, founder of the furniture brand IKEA. “You can do so much in 10 minutes’ time,” he assures.

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How to handle profits properly?

Book Value
The Complete TurtleTrader
Michael W. Covel
( http://www.harpercollins.com/ )

Turn ‘turtle’

How to handle profits properly is a separation point between winners and losers, writes Michael W. Covel in ‘The Complete TurtleTrader’ (http://www.harpercollins.com). “Great traders adjust their trading to the money they have at any one time.”
For example, if you had started with $1,00,000 account, and made quickly another $1,00,000, you now have $2,00,000, explains Covel. “Although you made a profit, you can’t say, ‘I can now take crazier risks with that $1,00,000.’” For, TurtleTrader philosophy is to treat the additional $1,00,000 like the original $1,00,000, with the same care and discipline.

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The essence of effective leadership

Book Value
Judgment
Noel M. Tichy and Warren G. Bennis(http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Make the right call

Good leaders not only make better calls, but they are able to discern the really important ones and get a higher percentage of them right, say Noel M. Tichy and Warren G. Bennis in ‘Judgment’ (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com).
“The thing that really matters is not how many calls a leader gets right, or even what percentage of calls a leader gets right. Rather, it is how many of the important ones he or she gets right,” they observe.

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The marketing strategy

Book Mark
The Fast Path to Corporate Growth
Marc H. Meyer
( http://www.oup.com/)

IBM lessons

What are the lessons from IBM’s successful turnaround and growth? “Perhaps the most important lesson is that a company with good people and good technology doesn’t have to go on an acquisition binge in order to grow,” observes Marc H. Meyer in The Fast Path to Corporate Growth (http://www.oup.com). “It can grow from within – by leveraging its capabilities to new users and uses.”

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The sales 'campaign'

Book Mark
The Education of an Accidental CEO
David Novak
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Been there, done that

Creating an expression that becomes part of the vernacular is every marketer’s dream, writes David Novak in The Education of an Accidental CEO (http://www.landmarkonthenet.com), while reminiscing about the ‘Mountain Dew’ campaign. The brand, owned by Pepsi, had a lot more going for it, but the way it had been marketed from the beginning always seemed to have limited its potential, recounts Novak. “It was perceived as unsophisticated, very country, and the well-established advertising guidelines perpetuated this notion by insisting that all Mountain Dew advertising include some sort of water imagery – mountain lakes, running streams, and the like.”

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Wednesday, April 02, 2008

The 'high-payoff' activities

Soft Skills
Becoming a Coaching Leader
Daniel Harkavy
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Manage time with four buckets

Have you ever done the exercise of dividing your ‘desired annual income’ by 2080? That’s the number of working hours in a year, assuming a forty-hour workweek, explains Daniel Harkavy in Becoming a Coaching Leader (www.landmarkonthenet.com). “If you want to make $1,00,000 a year, that’s about $50 an hour.” Once you know your hourly wage, it becomes much easier to ask the crucial question whether what you are currently doing is worth doing, says Harkavy.

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The simple formula for ‘strength’

Say Cheek
StrengthsFinder 2.0
Tom Rath
(http://www.landmarkonthenet.com)

Talent X investment = strength

Stop working on your weaknesses and, instead, start looking at your pluses, says Tom Rath in StrengthsFinder 2.0 (www.landmarkonthenet.com). “From the cradle to the cubicle, we devote more time to our shortcomings than to our strengths,” he rues. This is quite apparent in the way we create icons out of people who struggle to overcome a lack of natural talent, observes Rath.

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The eligibility criteria for a leader

Manage Mentor
Doing What Matters
James M. Kilts
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/)

Bet on the battle-tested manager

The team must be committed to the leader, but even more important, the leader must be committed to the team and to goals that go beyond self-interest, says James M. Kilts in Doing What Matters (www.landmarkonthenet.com).
Most companies today are matrixed organisations and require leaders who support one another regardless of the reporting relationships, he explains. “Unless leaders help others achieve their goals and objectives, the company will never be successful, and obviously the leader’s individual accomplishments will be meaningless.”

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Stability enables a nation to remain a nation

E-Dimension
The J Curve
Ian Bremmer
( http://www.landmarkonthenet.com/ )

Gyrations on the openness-stability grid

With ‘openness’ on the X-axis and ‘stability’ on the Y, plot each nation’s coordinates on the graph. What you get, when you connect the dots, will be a J shape, says Ian Bremmer in The J Curve. “Nations to the left of the dip in the J are less open; nations to the right are more open. Nations higher on the graph are more stable; those that are lower are less stable.”

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